Matisyahu Show Review and Slideshow – Regency Ballroom

MatisyahuMatisyahu
August 3, 2010
Regency Ballroom, San Francisco

The youthful crowd, punctuated here and there by a white-bearded Jewish elder, was restless, chanting Matis… Yahu… Matis… Yahu… until a tiny voice began its own repetition. From off-stage, the boy repeated his father’s words as a hush descended over those who waited. Finally, they walked onto the stage hand in hand, each gripping a microphone. As father and son sang a quiet duet, love, guidance, and tradition glowed from them. Afterward, Matisyahu, swaying gently on his feet, launched into a diverse set of reggae, liberally infused with rock, hip-hop, and spoken word.

Clearly his rocket to stardom has given him a lot to ponder and has provided him with a perch to reach out to not only the reggae crowd, but also the young Jewish kids seeking to connect with their own heritage. During the song “Jerusalem” (“Jerusalem if I forget you then my right hand forget what it’s supposed to do”), a group of men, heads covered, prayer shawls worn proudly, jumped up and down ecstatically. Reggae has always been spiritual music, but Matisyahu brings a new dimension, look, and audience to Jah’s music.



About Lee Abel :

Lee Abel first traveled to Jamaica in 1979 to photograph the Rastafarians. Her images since then have graced the covers of over 80 reggae albums, countless magazines and websites, and 2 editions of Lonely Planet's Guidebook to Jamaica. For more information, contact her at leeabel[AT]mindspring.com. | View all posts by Lee Abel

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About the author

Lee Abel first traveled to Jamaica in 1979 to photograph the Rastafarians. Her images since then have graced the covers of over 80 reggae albums, countless magazines and websites, and 2 editions of Lonely Planet's Guidebook to Jamaica. For more information, contact her at leeabel[AT]mindspring.com.

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