CD Review: Easy Star All Stars, Dub Side of the Moon

Dub Side of the MoonEasy Star All Stars

Easy Star Records

 

Let’s say you’re a huge fan of Pink Floyd’s mega-seller Dark Side of the Moon, and you have a little money to spend. You have a choice. You could buy the Special 30th Anniversary SACD/CD Edition of that very album, with 5.1 Surround Sound, new art and 20 page booklet; or you could buy “Dub Side of the Moon”, by a group you never heard of before.

What would you gain with choice #1? First, from your Significant Other, a frown and a question that in its spoken form is “Do you seriously need another copy of that?” and unspoken form is, “Are you really that much of a geek?” Second, the same old music. That’s it; that’s all you get.

Now, what would you gain with choice #2? First, from your SO, a curious but non-committal glance that says, “Okay, at least it’s different.” Second, distinctive music, although familiar tunes, lyrics, and song structures. Third, a renewed interest in an old favorite based on the successful execution of a brilliant idea, namely a creative reggae re-interpretation by talented musicians. Fourth, four bonus dub tracks. That’s it, that’s what you get.

 

 



About Ted Boothroyd :

Ted has enjoyed music all his increasingly lengthy life. He has gone through various favorite artists along the way, from his mommy crooning lullabies at crib side to his dad singing folk songs on car trips to The Everly Brothers to Ian and Sylvia to The Dave Brubeck Quartet to The Lovin’ Spoonful to The Kinks to The Miracles to Ravi Shankar to Tchaikovsky to Pentangle to Miriam Makeba to The Red Army Chorus and Band to Captain Beefheart to Gilbert and Sullivan to The McGarrigle Sisters to The Clash to Louis Jordan to The Flying Bulger Klezmer Band to Manu Chao. He has trouble choosing favorites when it comes to reggae - that fixation has been too longstanding and too complete. Ted started writing about music late in 2002 with a book review in The Beat, continuing with book and album reviews until the magazine's untimely passing. His association with Jahworks.org dates back to 2003, and he has hosted a couple of radio shows featuring reggae and "world music". Ted also sculpts in plaster and wood. | View all posts by Ted Boothroyd

Previous postCD Review: General Jah Mikey, Lyrical Ambassador Vol. 2 Next postQuality Sounds, Runnings, and Lyrics from Fifth Element Records

What do you think?

Name required

Website

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

*


It is free

It takes less than 30 seconds. Join Us

Login

Search Jahworks.org

About the author

Ted has enjoyed music all his increasingly lengthy life. He has gone through various favorite artists along the way, from his mommy crooning lullabies at crib side to his dad singing folk songs on car trips to The Everly Brothers to Ian and Sylvia to The Dave Brubeck Quartet to The Lovin’ Spoonful to The Kinks to The Miracles to Ravi Shankar to Tchaikovsky to Pentangle to Miriam Makeba to The Red Army Chorus and Band to Captain Beefheart to Gilbert and Sullivan to The McGarrigle Sisters to The Clash to Louis Jordan to The Flying Bulger Klezmer Band to Manu Chao. He has trouble choosing favorites when it comes to reggae - that fixation has been too longstanding and too complete.

Ted started writing about music late in 2002 with a book review in The Beat, continuing with book and album reviews until the magazine's untimely passing. His association with Jahworks.org dates back to 2003, and he has hosted a couple of radio shows featuring reggae and "world music". Ted also sculpts in plaster and wood.

Categories

FREE Newsletter

JahWorks.org | P.O. Box 9207 | Berkeley, CA 94709 | U.S.A.